woolypuffprincess:

urocy0n:

Bat-Eared Fox (Otocyon Megalotis)

autisticleafeon

woolypuffprincess:

urocy0n:

Bat-Eared Fox (Otocyon Megalotis)

autisticleafeon

"…the older I get, the more I see how women are described as having gone mad, when what they’ve actually become is knowledgeable and powerful and fucking furious."

mosellegreen:

alegbra:

have you ever gotten to that certain point in the school year where you just

image

Ah, yes. The second day.

vicesandvirtuesofaprettyodddisco:

I’m so sick of being me

last-snowfall:

geardrops:

swanjolras:

out of all the aspects of millennial-bashing, i think the one that most confuses me is the “millennials all got trophies as a kid, so now they’re all self-centered narcissists” theory

like— kids are pretty smart, y’all. they can see that every kid on the team gets a trophy and is told they did a good job; they can also see that not every kid on the team deserves a trophy, and not everyone did do a good job

the logical conclusion to draw from this is not “i’m great and i deserve praise”— it’s “no matter how mediocre i am, people will still praise me to make me feel better, so i can’t trust any compliments or accolades i receive”

this is not a recipe for overconfidence and narcissism. it is a recipe for constant self-guessing, low self-esteem, and a distrust of one’s own abilities and skills.

where did this whole “ugh millennials think their so-so work is super great” thing even come from it is a goddamn mystery

what fucking kills me is, yeah, maybe we got the trophies, but who gave them out

this is not a recipe for overconfidence and narcissism. it is a recipe for constant self-guessing, low self-esteem, and a distrust of one’s own abilities and skills.

Which is pretty much what mental health practitioners observe happening.

It’s also what I observed happening as a singing teacher: the older kids literally would not believe a positive word I said until I had proved I would tell them they screwed up/had done badly/etc. I did so in as useful a way as possible (“So this passage. We really need to work on this passage. A lot. This passage is not good yet.”), but with almost every adolescent I taught I had to prove I would give them straight-up criticism before they would parse my praise as anything other than meaningless “the grownups always do this” noise.

altonym:

Beer honestly just tastes how I imagine urine to taste it is so rank and people are always like nah try this because this is special Beer and then it’s like oh ok urine with cinnamon in it great

villainlooks:

the fact that I can’t grow horns is really cramping my style

babybowsers:

me: *petting a cat* nice

cat: *bathes self where i touched it*

me: image

"The Fed report reveals that the income of 25 percent of all Americans with a four-year degree is roughly the same as the average for those with just a high school diploma."

Do the Benefits of College Still Outweigh the Costs?

This suggests, say the authors, “that the economic benefit of a college education is relatively small for at least a quarter of those graduating with a bachelor’s degree.” They’re talking about 14 of the aforementioned 55 graduates.

Those 14 graduates, plus the 45 dropouts, mean that 59 percent of incoming public university freshman eventually fail to gain a financial upside for their investment. Just 41 percent of them “win” that bet, and the College Board says average annual tuition at the nation’s public universities is nearly $9,000 (or $36,000 for four years.) As noted, the chance of winning a lucky bet on a college football game is 50 percent, nine full percentage points higher than winning the tuition bet, but with immediate returns and no homework.

(via thinksquad)

gatorbiscuits:

*drinks water* im hydrating my flesh prison

scott-pilgrimage:

Just making sure you all know this photo exists

scott-pilgrimage:

Just making sure you all know this photo exists

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